Social Studies

New York State Standards

  • Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments and turning points in the history of the Credited States and New York.
  • Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in world history and examine the broad sweep of history from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live – local, national, and global-including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth’s surface.
  • Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of how the Credited States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making credits function in the Credited States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms.
  • Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for establishing governments; the governmental system of the Credited States and other nations; the Credited States Constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.

Every student must earn four credits in Social Studies.

Course Offerings

GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 9H, 9

1 Credit – Full Year Course

This is a survey course in World History (Prehistory to approximately 1750), focusing on the five social studies standards, the 15 common themes that recur across time and place, and eight historical eras. The purpose of this course is to present and explain the development of global beliefs; and the evolution of political, economic, & social systems, within our diverse and interdependent world. Students are required to do extensive reading, note taking, and to have serious organizational skills.

GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 10H, 10

1 Credit – Full Year Course

This is a survey course in World History (approximately 1750 to present), focusing on the five social studies standards, the 15 common themes that recur across time and place, and eight historical eras. The purpose of this course is to present and explain the development of global beliefs; and the evolution of political, economic, & social systems, within our diverse and interdependent world. Students are required to do extensive reading, note taking, and to have serious organizational skills.

The New York State Framework Exam in Global History and Geography II will be given as the final exam for this course.

UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT – GRADE 11

1 Credit – Full Year Course

The 11th grade course in the United States history will place emphasis on:

  • The major historical events and people who contribute to our cultural heritage.
  • The Constitution and its principles as a persistent theme in the historical development of the American nation and peoples.
  • Technical developments and their impact on the United States and its economic and social well-being.
  • The impact of various waves of immigration and internal migration have had upon the development of cultural diversity and unity in the United States.
  • An understanding of the workings of the national government through historical applications.
  • The deeply-rooted democratic values of United States society and how they have changed over time.
  • The important role which the United States plays in world affairs and how this role has expanded over time.
  • The relation between events, ideas, and the formation of public policy in the United States.
  • The U.S. History and Government History Regents Examination will be given as the final examination in this course.

AP AMERICAN HISTORY (Grade 11 Honors)

1 Credit – Full Year Course
Prerequisite: Students should have received a grade of at least 90 on the Global History and Geography Regents examination

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to a college introductory American history course. Students will be given the opportunity to challenge the Advanced Placement exam in May. The course will deal with the following topics:

  • Early America
  • Continental Expansion and National Development Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Age of Enterprise
  • Domestic and Foreign Affairs in the Progressive Era America between the Wars
  • World War II and Postwar Politics
  • Modern Political, Economic and Social Issues

SOCIAL STUDIES – GRADE 12

Students must take either Economics or SUPA Economics, and Participation in Gov’t, or SUPA Public Affairs to meet the 12th grade Social Studies requirements.

ECONOMICS – GRADE 12

1/2 Credit – Half Year Course

Students in the study of economics will have an understanding of:

  • Basic economic concepts such as scarcity, supply and demand, markets, productivity, and opportunity cost, specialization, productive resources, interdependence, growth and economic systems.
  • The economic system of the Credited States and how it operates.
  • The roles of various components of the American Economic system.
  • His/her role in the economic system as consumer, worker, inventor, and/or voting citizens.
  • The interdependence of the world’s economics today.
  • The political and social impact of economic decisions and the impact of economics on political and social decisions.
  • Basic differences between different types of economic systems and their operations.

PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT – GRADE 12

1/2 Credit – Half Year Course

This course makes the assumption that students will have an understanding of the basic structures, functions, and operations of the American Government to enable them to apply both the principles and practices of Government in a program which calls upon them to be participants in the process of public policy formation and action. Attendance at two public meetings are required for this course.

SUPA ECONOMICS   (Syracuse University Project Advance) (honors elective)

1/2 Credit – Half Year Course College Credit:  SUPA

The goals of this course are to introduce students to the ideas that form the foundation of modern western (Neoclassical) economic thought, to examine the basic framework (the model) that economists have built on this foundation, and to show how this model is applied to current issues facing individuals and society.

The course begins with a presentation of the scientific method, which is then used to analyze the question: How do individuals and societies make choices when they are faced with scarcity?  Beginning with the individual in the simplest of situations, a one-person society, the course moves step by step to develop a model of a complex society based on division of labor and exchange through markets. The process takes students from the microeconomics to the macro-economic level, emphasizing the connection between these two perspectives. Students examine the benefits, as well as the problems, inherent in a market-oriented economy. The course prepares students to analyze and understand the ongoing economic policy debate between interventionists and non-interventionists.

This course is the same as Economics 203 at Syracuse University. Students in this course are expected to register for three (3) credit hours from Syracuse University. Financial aid is available.

SUPA PUBLIC AFFAIRS   (Syracuse University Project Advance) (honors elective)

1/2 Credit – Half Year Course College Credit:  SUPA

Public Affairs 101, Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy, is designed to provide students with basic research, communications, and decision-making skills used in public policy analysis. In addition, students are required to read and analyze articles in various news sources on local, state, and international public policy issues. The student, with instructor’s approval, determines which public policy issues are chosen for study throughout the semester. The content coverage of the course, while important, is secondary to the development of a range of applied social science skills that will help the student make more informed choices as a citizen, worker, and consumer.

This course is the same as Public Affairs 101 at Syracuse University. Students in this course are expected to register for three (3) credit hours from Syracuse University. Financial aid is available.

SUPA SOCIOLOGY (Syracuse University Project Advance) (honors elective)

1/2 Credit – Half Year Course College Credit: SUPA

This introductory course in sociology uses recent journal articles from professional social science journals to examine issues of society. After an introductory credit on basic concepts of sociology, students examine credits on social research, culture and groups, media, identity, social inequalities, and social changes.

Students will be expected to have the ability to read college-level content, and produce high-level work in this writing-intensive course. This course is the same as Sociology 101 at Syracuse University. Students in this course are expected to register for three (3) credit hours from Syracuse University. Financial aid is available.

SUPA PERSONAL FINANCE (Syracuse University Project Advance) (honors elective)

1/2 Credit – Half Year Course College Credit: SUPA

This course covers essential aspects of consumer personal finance, including record keeping, budgeting, banking, borrowing, investing, insurance, taxes and retirement planning. Students will learn important institutional facts about different types of bank deposits; mutual funds; bonds, including US Savings Bonds; stocks; loans, including credit cards and fixed and adjustable rate mortgages, retirement accounts, such as Individual Retirement Accounts and 401(k) plans; tax deductions and credits; and insurance.

Coverage of this important institutional personal finance material will be framed within basic fundamentals of economic analysis. Coverage and application of key economic tools and concepts will include income versus wealth, tradeoffs, the role of time in choice (e.g. discounting and discount rates, present value) the role of risk in choice (unknown future, probability), liquidity, credit risk, market risk, interest/rate of return, actual and expected inflation, real rates of interest, and compounding. This conceptual basis gives students a framework for evaluating and applying to their financial planning new innovations or changes in financial products over time. Overall, the course helps to provide a foundation for students to make reasoned choices with regard to financial decisions over their professional and personal lives.

This course is the same as Finance 200 at Syracuse University.   Students in this course are expected to register for three (3) credit hours from Syracuse University. Financial aid is available.

AP PSYCHOLOGY

1 Credit – Full Year Course

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior in good academic standing

Students will be exposed to the various psychological theories and their applications through readings, videos, and class participation. Students will arrive at a set definition of psychology and how it affects society and ourselves. Students will be able to demonstrate competence through classroom examinations and mastery on the Advanced Placement Exam.

COLD WAR AND THE U.S.

1/2 Credit – Half Year Course
Prerequisite: Seniors in good academic standing

Students will explore and examine events from 1945-1991; the history that is not in the standard textbook regents driven curriculum. Students will have the time to study, research, and present, to their fellow historians, the immediate and long term results of Cold War actions on American and World history.

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